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Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Practice Drills For #TEOTWAWKI


How many times as preppers do we gather, organize, and store, but put off drill and practice?

A lot of us are guilty of this.

We think because we’ve rehearsed it once that we will be able to respond automatistically in a crisis.

But that “responding without having to think” mode comes from practice and drills.

You have your bug-out bag, but how fast can you get it to your car and be gone?

You have a bug-out bag, but is it even up to date? 

Uh oh!

All of us should have a fire evacuation plan, but do we rehearse it?


As an example, I do have a fire plan, but I am guilty of not rehearsing because my house is a single story dwelling, the #SCARE box [CLICK HERE TO READ MORE]is right by the exit window, and the fire mask is beside it.

Uh oh!



So, what are your excuses?

“I’m busy.”

“My plan is foolproof.”

“I’ll get around to it.”

We all have excuses because we all make them.

Part of rehearsing is admitting to yourself that threats are real and that you don’t have all the answers.

The best you can do is the best you can do.

But you can’t do your best without practicing your plan.

I have a lot to do.

Prepare well, my friends.

Monday, February 27, 2017

Old School #TEOTWAWKI



Although I love the 1950s , I do not want to live in a used-to-be world.

Nevertheless, some aspects of that era are still pertinent today.

In the 1950s, Americans believed the pesky Russians could nuke them at any time.

Americans of that era rehearsed what they should do in the event of a nuclear detonation nearby.

They did something rather than whistling past the graveyard as so many now do.

They built bomb shelters in their back yards and stocked them supplies.

They conducted preparedness drills in their homes.

Kids ducked and covered in schools.

They at least tried.



We know now that some aspects of what was believed to be an appropriate response to a nuclear blast would not have actually worked.

But people prepared for the end of the world as they knew it because they believed it could happen.

They saw it as a patriotic duty then just as preppers feel it is their patriotic duty now to be ready.

These days, some believe a nuclear event cannot happen and therefore laugh it off. 

Others believe #TEOTWAWKI will happen in the next five minutes and make themselves look like idiots with their commando rhetoric.

We all need to prep for the possibility of many threats, a nuclear event being one of them.


A nuke attack is a credible threat and not getting ready is idiocy.


Of course, back then the media was credible.

No one needed to question Walter Cronkite’s veracity.

Granted, the media did not report everything, but neither—ironically—do they do so today either.

Back then, people believed the news would tell them of an impending threat.

They could trust what the media told them.

Today, the media does editorials. calls them news, and lies to our faces.

Therefore, it is harder today to get good information.

We have to be more proactive.

We have to do a lot more than nothing.

We have to prep well, my friends.